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  • About Evearad Stelfox

      Description

      Born and raised on the east coast in Maryland and Pennsylvania, Evearad Stelfox subsequently lived many years on the west coast in California and Oregon before moving back to the eastern United States. Before leaving Oregon and moving to Vermont in 2003, he exhibited at the University of Oregon and the Criterion Gallery, both in Eugene, Oregon. In August 2006 Evearad was a featured artist at the Chaffee Art Center in Rutland, Vermont. In the summer of 2007 he, with his wife Nan and dog Emma, moved to Portland, Maine to make it their home and to pursue his photographic work. Rarely shown before, his photographs demonstrate many years of work and his intense interest in the art of collage and contemporary photography. He has recently exhibited in Portland, Maine, Cambridge Art Association and Newburyport Art Association.
      Evearad Stelfox began his career in art in the 1970's where he attended the Brooks Institute of Photography in Santa Barbara, California. There he pursued several aspects of photography and did some professional work in the field during that time. His interest in fine art photography led him to attain a Bachelor of Art degree in 1978 with a focus in studio art and then a Masters degree in Art and photography in 1980 from Humboldt State University in Arcata, California. Since this time, Evearad has continued to work on photographic collage pieces as well as work professionally in the art and museum field.
      An avid art historian, most of the images Evearad creates reflect this interest and include juxtaposing older art historical images with current, contemporary images of the world we live in. Photographs taken on his many walks are collaged and constructed alongside many other images of interest. The result is a myriad of ethereal ideas, shapes, realities and non-realities, blended in a final photographic contact print. He states, “I am fascinated by the bringing together of many, and quite often unrelated, images to make the single image merge into a unity and a wholeness of its own.”